Course Information

Notes on Research Project Essays

Please refer to this check list carefully when revising:

[ ] APA style for formatting a cover page: (1) check “Different first page,” (2) Running head: HEADER (note caps), (3) page number on title page (inserting page numbers does not work; type “1”). Use a page break to start page 2

[ ] Include your title from the title page at top of page 2 before starting essay. Do not put a subhead under the title.

[ ] The opening should be a vivid and credible narrative or personal narrative, 3-4 paragraphs long. Before moving to the next section, clarify the purpose of this project essay (analysis of media coverage of a topic compared to the research base on the topic).

[ ] Avoid confusing being general in the opening for being vague; in fact, about both general and vague. For example, “Teaching grammar has become a serious debate in the U.S.” This says nothing.

[ ] Use subheads (flush left, bold, caps; Level 2) after the opening to guide your reader through the major sections that must include: an analysis of media coverage of your topic, an overview of research (a mini-lit review) on your topic, and a final analysis of how those compare.

[ ] Your ending should create cohesion for your discussion, possibly by returning to your opening narrative. A call to action or framing for your reader how to move forward in terms of your topic are effective.

[ ] Avoid huge, rambling paragraphs. Work on flow, cohesion.

[ ] Use a page break to begin your reference. References must include all scholarly and media sources. Take care with hanging indents (no return>tab; use the ruler or menu and have 1/2″ hanging indents) and all APA formatting (italics, periods and commas, caps and lower case, etc.). Never submit a cited essay, even a draft, without the references list as part of the essay.

[ ] In-text citations must be accurate, neither omitted or over-cited. Look carefully at the sample provided. But some issues include:

  • APA focuses on Author (year) so keep them together and cite immediately: Thomas (2016) argues … . Or: … (Thomas, 2016). The name is used only once in any sentence to cite; pronouns count as using the name.
  • Use page numbers with all quotes from hard copy references, although you should quote rarely or not at all when synthesizing scholarly sources. For example, “…” (Thomas, 2016, p. 12). Note the space and period placement.
  • Do not plod through your scholarly sources one at a time; synthesize your research and then discuss the patterns and themes, citing multiple sources per pattern/theme. Do not refer to authors, titles, or that you are doing research (or that your source authors did research).
  • Parenthetical formatting: (Thomas, 2016). (Thomas, 2016, p. 12). (Black & White, 2013). (Black, Brown, & White, 2012). (Black, 2014; Brown, 2016; White, 2017).
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EDU 250 – Topics Spring 2018

EDU 250 – Topics

Name Topic
Maddie Gonzalez Recess
Tatiana Oliveira Banned books and censorship
Erikah Haavie Erskine Charter Institute and charter school authorizers
Betsy Morris gifted programs and the underrepresentation of non-white students
Morgan Smith Grade retention
Meredith Dixon School segregation
Addie Robards school-to-prison pipeline
Caroline King Physical activity, elementary education
Kelsey Milian Dual- Enrollment programs/ Early College
Emma Allison Police in schools
Delaney Fleming School lunch, academic achievement
Miller Leeson Special education, inclusion
Greg Peterson School safety, gun control
Matthew Martin probable cause search standard, instead of a reasonable suspicion, for public school students
Evelyn Gould Twins, nature v. nurture
Lauren Hood Unschooling
Samuel Shelton Charter schools
Camilla Bellows early childhood trauma

 

Submitting Assignments and Final Grade Sheet

Assignment Submission Guidelines

eJournals: Submit eJournals before designated class session per the schedule. Include the eJournal and appropriate number in the SUBJECT line of the email, and please PASTE response in the body of the email (do not attach eJournals as Word files).

Annotated bibliographies: Submit annotated bibliographies in both the initial and final submissions (all drafts should be complete and in proper format, even when submitting “rough” or initial drafts) as Word files and attach to email with “annotated bibliographies” in the subject line. See some guidelines and a sample annotated bibliography here (note APA version). Submit each annotated bibliography as a separate Word file, and format in Times New Roman font, 12 pt., double space, with 1″ margins. Each file should be named “lastname AB#.docx” (each file numbered from 1 through 8 or 10).

Research project essay: Submit research project cited essay in both the initial and final submissions (all drafts should be complete and in proper format, even when submitting “rough” or initial drafts) as Word files and attach to email with “research project essay” in the subject line. See APA guidelines here and a sample APA essay here. Submit essay as a Word file, and format in Times New Roman font, 12 pt., double space, with 1″ margins. Each file should be named “lastname essay.docx” (as you revise and resubmit, add RW, RW2, RW3, etc., to the file name to designate multiple drafts).

Public commentary: Submit your public commentary in both the initial and final submissions (all drafts should be complete and in proper format, even when submitting “rough” or initial drafts) as Word files and attach to email with “public commentary” in the subject line. See a sample public commentary here. Submit essay as a Word file, and format in Times New Roman font, 12 pt., single space, with 1″ margins. Each file should be named “lastname OpEd.docx” (as you revise and resubmit, add RW, RW2, RW3, etc., to the file name to designate multiple drafts).

Grade Sheet for Final Portfolio/ Exam:

EDU250.FinalGr.F17 copy